Dubbin Education

Pappy’s Premium Dubbin

Pappy’s Premium Dubbin is our original and most used product. As a saddlemaker I have used it for many years. It is good for all leathers. It is easy to use, gentle and even good for your hands, while it also softens and maintains leathers. This product is loved by braiders, which was the original use, and people become dependant on having it onhand. It is very good at keeping leather healthy and good for many uses, but does not repel water. From this product came the slogan, “Makes Leather Work Better”.  It works better if you are a craftsman and trying to create your art. It works better if you are a cowboy, cyclist or other user and depend on healthy leather for your work or pleasure. This is a product you can depend on.

 

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Recommended Uses: Braiding, lacing, strings, all smooth leather, keeps leather healthy. See Product Comparison Chart for other uses.

 

Pappy’s Liquid or Premium-Lite Dubbin

This product is great for thin leathers, and is very creamy and nice to use. I soak saddle string, lacing strings or braiding string in it for an hour or two or over night, squeegee it off between my fingers, let it cure for a couple days, or just use it if pressed for time. It makes strong and beautiful strings. My favorite saddle string leather is a dry Indian tan latigo. Soak it in Liquid Dubbin for beautiful strings.  It is a very versatile product and quite different from Premium from which it is made.

 

 

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Recommended Uses: Braiding, lacing, soaking for complete penetration, and for lighter, or tooled leather. See Product Comparison Chart for other uses.

 

Pappy’s Bee Dry Dubbin (Boot and Chap Wax)


This is the only Pappy’s Dubbin product that repels water. I have tested it for over three years and it definitely helps prolong the life of leather that is exposed to moisture compared to other leather products I have used in the comparisons. It is not intended for leather stored in humid areas that you are trying to stop the mold growth on, but rather for boots, gloves, chaps and other things that are rained on or get wet from morning dew and everyday use. I use it for back cinch straps and latigos, for the back side of the fender and stirrup leathers that comes against the horse, and for saddle strings that get wet from sweat. Another use is for a cantle binding where the rope rubs, or the swells where the rope rubs, it helps the leather move under the rope and helps to keep from being so worn off from the abrasion. I have tried to keep the oils down so the leather doesn’t get soggy or sticky. With all of these products if you get it in the tooling use an air compressor or brush and remove it before it sets up in the depressions. It polishes very well. I would hate to be without this fine product.

 

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Recommended Uses: Preserving and protecting leather exposed to occasional wet conditions.  See Product Comparison Chart for other uses.

 

Dubbin’s Cousin for Rawhide


A soap-based product for rawhid braiding and care made from Premium Dubbin using a unique process. A rawhide braider can apply this generously to the strings after cutting them from wet rawhide and it will help reduce the mold growth until the job is finished. Some braiders apply it to dry rawhide for overnight casing, add some more with a little water the next day and braid. Braiders report the strings lay and stay flat and buff up pretty when the job is done. It works well to clean used equipment and often brings the used rawhide tack back to original beauty. It will replace saddle soap for cleaning leather goods. It has a higher PH and can be hard on hands so if you are in it for hours you might need to protect your hands. Some customers even use it with leather, and with a higher PH it may help prevent mold growth. One customer said that I must be a genius for inventing it and that it made him look like a genius to his customers when he uses it. It has unique qualities.

 

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Recommended Uses: A soap product for braiding, lacing, and working with rawhide or leather where oils are less desired. See Product Comparison Chart for other uses.

 

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